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Science

Science

Canned and Frozen Veggies Are More Nutritious than Fresh Ones

If you’re trying to get the most nutritional bang for your buck, it seems obvious that shopping in the produce section is better than shopping in the frozen aisle. In reality, however, the opposite is often true: frozen and canned produce can have many more nutrients than its fresh counterparts. Fresh From the Can How …

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MIT Researchers Designed An AI That Deduces A Food’s Ingredients From Its Photo

Food doesn’t always come with an ingredients label, but sometimes — when you’ve got an allergy, for instance, or if you’re dying to make a restaurant dish at home — it sure would come in handy. MIT and QCRI researchers are trying to make that a possibility with Pic2Recipe, an artificial intelligence system designed to …

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What Words Like “Fresh” Really Tell You About How Fancy Your Food Is

You are what you eat. So the words that describe your food should tell you something about what you’re eating. But that’s not always the case. Linguists have studied the words written about food on menus, restaurant reviews, and food packaging, and as linguist Dan Jurafsky explains in his book “The Language of Food,” what they’ve …

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US Army algorithm determines ideal caffeine dosage patterns

The US Army has developed an algorithm that can optimize your caffeine consumption to maximize alertness when experiencing sleep loss(Credit: belchonock/Depositphotos) How many cups of coffee do you have a day? It’s not a stretch to say that caffeine is the world’s most popular drug. A recent study found that 85 percent of American adults consume …

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How to Reconstruct an Ancient Meal From Dirty Dishes Alone

Archaeologists and chefs used chemical analysis—and their taste buds—to solve a culinary puzzle from China. Childs took a few liberties with the reimagined Siwa recipe, adding apricots, carrots, and other ingredients. JESSICA HESTER/ATLAS OBSCURA AT A RECENT TASTING IN New York City, diners could sample food spanning continents and millennia. There was Babylonian lamb-and-beet stew, …

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